Dave J Hayes's Page

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Dave J Hayes posted a blog post

What do deactivations in neuroimaging mean?

By now, we’re all familiar with the colourful spots and blobs associated with brain imaging. The assumption is often that areas which ‘light up’ are increasingly activated – and are, as such, implicitly more ‘important’ – in the task under study. But researchers using brain imaging techniques know this to be untrue...moreSee More
Jan 8
A blog post by Dave J Hayes was featured

Brain-based evidence for multiple intelligences?

Is there any brain-based evidence for the theory of multiple intelligences? From my viewpoint, the answer seems clear: Yes….and no. (Germans have a nice colloquialism for this in ‘jein’, pronounced yine.) The theory of multiple intelligences was originally proposed by the psychologist…See More
Nov 9, 2011
Dave J Hayes posted blog posts
Oct 28, 2011
Dave J Hayes posted blog posts
Oct 21, 2011
Dave J Hayes posted a blog post

Is it time for a conceptual revolution in neuroscience?

 A recent article by Russell Poldrack and colleagues begins with an apt quote from Rutherford D. Rogers, the former Yale University Librarian:“We’re drowning in information and starving for knowledge” They chose this quote to reflect what some brain researchers (myself included) might call a major roadblock in…See More
Oct 20, 2011
Dave J Hayes posted blog posts
Oct 18, 2011
Dave J Hayes posted a blog post

Brain-based evidence for multiple intelligences?

Is there any brain-based evidence for the theory of multiple intelligences? From my viewpoint, the answer seems clear: Yes….and no. (Germans have a nice colloquialism for this in ‘jein’, pronounced yine.) The theory of multiple intelligences was originally proposed by the psychologist…See More
Aug 1, 2011
Dave J Hayes posted a status
"Brain-based evidence for multiple intelligences? http://neurosphere.wordpress.com/"
Jul 31, 2011
Dave J Hayes posted a blog post

Human Brain Mapping (HBM) 2011

Human Brain Mapping in Quebec City was an excellent, if not slightly overwhelming, conference which brought together the often discrepant worlds of neuroscience, psychology, psychiatry, physics, engineering, mathematics, and computer science. (Did I miss anyone?) For a first-timer – and someone relatively new to the world of neuroimaging – it was a whirlwind opportunity to try to absorb as much wisdom as possible about…See More
Jul 8, 2011
Dave J Hayes joined Nathan W. Schultheiss's group
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Postdocs in Neuroscience

Postdocs are at the cross-roads of education and profession, and we face unique professional and social challenges, particularly in the current academic and economic climates. This group is intended for sharing related insights strategies & comments.See More
Jul 8, 2011
Dave J Hayes joined Nathan W. Schultheiss's group
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Synchronization and Oscillations

This group is intended for those interested in cellular and network mechanisms and the functional significance of normal and pathological synchronization and oscillations observed in small invertebrate to large cortical neuronal networks.
Jul 8, 2011
Dave J Hayes joined Karin Buetler's group
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Neuropsychology

A group dedicated to neuropsychology/cognitive neuroscience tackling the neural underpinnings of higher cognitive functions as well as its clinical application.Image: http://www.tcneuropsychology.com/Brain_Picture.jpg See More
Jul 8, 2011
Dave J Hayes joined Dr Marcus Kaiser's group
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Structure and Dynamics of Brain Connectivity Networks

This group discusses methods for generating and analyzing brain connectivity data (the "connectome") and how to simulate development and dynamics on anatomicially realistic neural networks. It can also be used to announce jobs, events, and CFP's.
Jul 8, 2011
Dave J Hayes joined William H. Nesse's group
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Theoretical Neuroscience

Dedicated to exploring theoretical constructs in neuroscience, using a synergy of experimental, mathematical, and computational methods.
Jul 8, 2011
Dave J Hayes joined Markus A. Dahlem's group
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Neurological disorders

A discussion group that focuses the common aspects, e.g. upcoming conferences, new funding schemes, journals etc.
Jul 8, 2011
Dave J Hayes updated their profile
Jun 6, 2011

Profile Information

Main areas of research:
See www.neuroscientist.ca
Interests/keywords:
Emotion, reward/aversion, translational, animal models, human neuroimaging, behavioural psychopharmacology
Current title/position:
Neuroscientist CIHR Postdoctoral Fellow
Current affiliation/employer:
See imhr.ca
Personal or laboratory homepage:
http://www.neuroscientist.ca
Publications:
See
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=hayes%20d%20%28northoff%20o...

Dave J Hayes's Blog

What do deactivations in neuroimaging mean?

Posted on November 30, 2013 at 10:05pm 0 Comments

By now, we’re all familiar with the colourful spots and blobs associated with brain imaging. The assumption is often that areas which ‘light up’ are increasingly activated – and are, as such, implicitly more ‘important’ – in the task under study. But researchers using brain imaging techniques know this to be untrue...more

Brain-based evidence for multiple intelligences?

Posted on October 26, 2011 at 11:30am 0 Comments

Is there any brain-based evidence for the theory of multiple intelligences? From my viewpoint, the answer seems clear: Yes….and no. (Germans have a nice colloquialism for this in ‘jein’, pronounced yine.)



The theory of multiple intelligences was originally proposed by… Continue

Physical consciousness?

Posted on October 26, 2011 at 11:29am 0 Comments

This guest blog was written by Christian Stevens, a graduate student in the philosophy department at the University of Guelph. His work is in the area of Epistemology and Philosophy of Mind.



We are physical beings in a physical world. This is the thesis of physicalism, the view that reality is made up of one kind of ‘stuff,’ and that stuff is…

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The aversive brain

Posted on October 26, 2011 at 11:28am 0 Comments

 

The ability to detect and respond appropriately to aversive things or events in our environment is essential for all organisms, from fruit flies to humans. Although much is known about aversive responding at the psychological level (e.g. displays of fear, disgust) and at the physiological level (e.g. increased heart rate, changes in electrical skin conductance), much less is…

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