William Lu's Page

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D. Oliver Castillo Rolón favorited William Lu's blog post Anticipating reward improves learning during sleep
Sunday
William Lu commented on William Lu's blog post Earworms, lyrics, and tunes in the brain
"might be...however, it's equally possible that music is processed through a separate network (but i'm equally as lazy to look it up)"
Apr 19, 2010
W. Howard Buddin Jr commented on William Lu's blog post Earworms, lyrics, and tunes in the brain
"Probably nothing out there (I must admit, too lazy to look right now), but it makes one wonder if individuals with receptive speech disorders (e.g., central auditory processing) are as or less susceptible to earworms."
Apr 18, 2010
Rich and Co. commented on William Lu's blog post The power of prediction reduces activation in the primary visual cortex
"There is empirical evidence for efficiency model of intelligence. MIT has a short video with great movies. Differences are dramatic."
Apr 7, 2010
William Lu posted blog posts
Mar 19, 2010
William Lu posted a blog post

Earworms, lyrics, and tunes in the brain

Last time I left off quoting Lady GaGa's masterwork Poker Face. I continue to rag on it because I can't seem to escape it's repetitive and forced impingement on my vulnerable eardrums. Unfortunately, the city doesn't afford much auditory privacy and some people in the subway are really determined to lose their hearing before old age.…See More
Mar 16, 2010
William Lu posted a blog post

Sleep deprivation impairs emotion recognition

The ability to read emotions is an important part of the human experience; the only way to successfully navigate through complex social environments. It comes in handy especially if you don the title of psychotherapist or professional poker player. Without it, you become socially inept. You enter the world of the autistic individual.Thanks to Charles Darwin we now know that it’s…See More
Mar 10, 2010
William Lu posted blog posts
Mar 1, 2010
William Lu posted a blog post

The power of prediction reduces activation in the primary visual cortex

Prediction is an invaluable skill for navigating through complex environments. Somehow the brain generates predictions about perceptual inputs it's likely to receive using contextual information from recent memory. Statistical regularities are learned (e.g. movement and attack patterns of Mega Man bosses) and lead to less activation in corresponding brain areas. The brain is truly a miserly organ. "Why put in more work than…See More
Feb 26, 2010
William Lu posted a blog post

Can distractions really enhance motor performance?

Texting while driving seems to score pretty high up there on the "I really shouldn't be doing this right now" list. A recent study by the…See More
Jan 21, 2010
William Lu posted a blog post

Anticipating reward improves learning during sleep

Rocking out on the guitar is by far one of my most cherished pastimes. At the angst ridden age of 15 I picked up a cheap Ibanez strat and learned my very first Nirvana song, "Teen Spirit". Little did I know a good night's rest would play such a crucial role in my learning those simple power chords.…See More
Jan 6, 2010
William Lu posted a blog post

Can modern day gadgets help combat prejudice?

Prejudice...we've all experienced it at one point or another. Defined as a preconceived belief, opinion, or judgment toward a group or person because of race, social class, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, etc., it also means a priori beliefs that include any unreasonable attitude that is unusually resistant to rational influence. It's been the cause of countless wars and an infinite amount of unnecessary…See More
Dec 22, 2009
William Lu posted a blog post

The somniloquy hypothesis: How the immature brain learns facts

A while back I wrote about the possible adaptive function of somnambulism or sleep-walking. Well...I've come up with yet another hypothesis addressing an "abnormal" behavior falling under parasomnias.Somniloquy or sleep-talking can happen during stages of REM or NREM sleep (I'm speaking to the latter). This seemingly bizarre behavior typically occurs in childhood and is outgrown by puberty. Presentation can vary from rhythmic nonsense words to long coherent speeches. No one really knows where…See More
Nov 17, 2009
William Lu posted a blog post

The dual-tasking meditation master

I recently read an article in the latest Scientific American Mind magazine discussing the cell mechanisms underlying meditative states. The author briefly mentioned the fact that expert meditators were able to avoid the attentional blink that lay people seem to experience when attending to rapid firing visual stimuli. This brought up a question for me. Would expert meditators perform better on dual-tasks compared to age-matched control subjects?I believe the answer is in the affirmative. The…See More
Nov 10, 2009
William Lu posted a blog post

I've been endlessly scoring digit-symbol coding protocols (fun...), a subtest of the WAIS-IV, for the past few weeks at my new neuropsych externship so the following article seems particularly releva…

I've been endlessly scoring digit-symbol coding protocols (fun...), a subtest of the WAIS-IV, for the past few weeks at my new neuropsych externship so the following article seems particularly relevant. In a recent study by Cantlon and colleagues published in the latest Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, they decided to measure the brain activity of 6-7 year-old children during numerical comparison tasks using fMRI.An example of a numerical comparsion task:...participants were required to…See More
Oct 6, 2009
William Lu posted a blog post

Bye bye modular, hello cognit!

Termed by Fuster in 2006, the construct was created to solve the problematic yet popular view that the human brain is made up of discrete cortical domains dedicated exclusively to visual discrimination, language, spatial attention, face recognition, motor programming, memory retrieval, and working memory.Although the modular modeling of the brain has utterly failed due to a lack of conclusive evidence, many neuroscientists continue to maintain this antiquated view... but why? Put quite simply,…See More
Sep 30, 2009

Profile Information

Main areas of research:
sleep, working memory
Interests/keywords:
memory, sleep, meditation, consciousness, quantum physics, spirituality
Current title/position:
Clinical psychology graduate student
Personal or laboratory homepage:
http://thequantumlobechronicles.blogspot.com

William Lu's Blog

Parkinsonian emotion recognition impairment better accounted for by sleep deprivation

Posted on March 18, 2010 at 5:30pm 0 Comments



The New York Times recently covered a paper by Grey and Tickle-Degnen, published in the journal Neuropsychology, finding that people with… Continue

Earworms, lyrics, and tunes in the brain

Posted on March 16, 2010 at 12:56pm 2 Comments

Last time I left off quoting Lady GaGa's masterwork Poker Face. I continue to rag on it because I can't seem to escape it's repetitive and forced impingement on my vulnerable eardrums.… Continue

How looking away prevents pedestrian collisions

Posted on March 1, 2010 at 10:30am 0 Comments

One day a friend and I were briskly strolling along a mall corridor, engaged in conversation, until something quite hilarious happened. A burly gentleman was quickly approaching my friend's direct… Continue

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At 11:36am on May 5, 2010, Vemuri Ramesam said…
Hi,

Nice to know that you are interested in Spirituality.

I request you to visit my Blog page when you have time , see the PPts, and some of the past posts (particularly my posts in June-July 2009 re: Neuronal correlates of a Jivanmukta). Jivanmukta is one whose individuating ego (self) has collapsed and he/she finds a Oneness (Non-duality). Non-duality is the ultimate solution from ancient India for alleviation of grief/sorrow/misery .

I invite you to comment/contribute/question.
Link to my Blog page: http://beyond-advaita.blogspot.com/

thanks and regards,
ramesam
At 2:17pm on April 12, 2010, Janet Wise said…
Going over some of your previous comments, I see that you have ecclectic interests, indeed, like mine. As far as books go, the things that bother me about the most current books on neuroscience and quantum physics, is that they presume to marry the two and come to a conclusion without acknowledging the uniqueness and personhood of the individual. That is the problem with putting our focus upon the submicroscopic levels. We sometimes forget what the whole picture looks like--the one right in front of our nose. It is so much easier to see the world (pun intended) with our singular, myopic view, figure it out through our own lens, and get our views published in the name of "science." Not leaving out the facts; there are patterns of behavior and physiological occurrences that are consistent, which we can identify and begin to make hypotheses about. I am very excited, however, about the work with synaptic vibrations, and the associations of quantum mechanical behavior and free will. I read as many current papers as I can on it, and subscribe to a few journals online.
At 10:49pm on February 12, 2010, William Lu said…
Hi Veronica, what are these important reasons you speak of?
At 1:27pm on December 15, 2009, William Lu said…
Hi Asha,

I'm not exactly what the answer is for your question. Alzheimer'c can severely impair daily functioning in the brain. Perhaps having signs around the room pointing to where the bathroom is may help. Other than that, I'm not quite sure. Have you tried adult diapers?
At 5:01am on December 14, 2009, Asha Sahgal said…
I Asha Sahgal looks after my alzeihmers patient.husband. Can you guide me how his brain works to be toilet trained
 
 
 

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